Canolfan Owain Glyndwr CentreCYMRAEG  
 

The Building


Recent archaeological research has shown that the Parliament Building dates from the late medieval period. Is this then the building where Owain Glyndŵr, Griffith Young who was his Chancellor, representatives from many parts of Wales and dignitaries from Scotland, France and Castile (Spain) walked in 1404?

According to a report by the Committee to Develop the Centre in 2006:-" ... we can be confídent that the building we know as Parliament House was built, or reconstructed, shortly after 1460."

The Parliament House

The Parliament House

We can be confident that the building we know as Parliament House was built or reconstructed shortly after 1460. It is therefore probable that the building was built some two generations later than the date of the famous parliament meeting, but that it was located on that site. However, the word "reconstructed" holds out the intriguing possibility that part of the building may have existed when Glyndŵr's parliament met in 1404.



Whatever the uncertainty regarding the exact date of its construction,it is a rare example of a late medieval Welsh town house. Because of its historical significance it is a Grade 1 listed building.

We know little of its history over the following centuries. However, its condition had deteriorated significantly by the late C19. The building's saviour was the local MP, David Davies. His grandfather was known as "Davies the Ocean" and he had made his fortune in the coal and shipping industries of South Wales. His grandson spent part of this fortune on restoring Parliament House and building another attractive feature next door. This latter building was to become known as "The Institute" David Davies bought the building in 1906 and both buildings were opened in 1912. The town library was located in Parliament House, but later moved to a site opposite.

David Davies' intentions were quite clear. One priority was establishing a national memorial to Owain Glyndŵr. There would also be facilities such as meeting rooms and a bowling green at the rear for local people. Davies' commitment to commemorating Glyndŵr is shown in the important mural inside Parliament House. As Jan Morris notes in her work of 1993, so keen was David Davies on the project that the Murray Urquhart mural of the battle of Hyddgen depicts Glyndŵr with the local M.P's face. The mural can still be seen today. The artist, Peter Lord, believes that this is the only large scale mural of its kind created before 1914.

The Parliament House from the rear

The Parliament House from the rear


After the Great War of 1914 -1918, the buildings were widely used by the local community. Before the advent of the car, local farmers would tie their horses at the rear on market day. Local councils have met in the "Institute" over the years. When the buildings faced financial problems in the 1970's a group of local people came together to prevent its sale. The Management Committee now seek to reinvigorate David Davies's vision.
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The Centre is sponsored by CADW and the Welsh Assembly Government